Kyffhäuser (Verwaltungsgemeinschaft)

This article is an orphan, as no other articles link to it. Please introduce links to this page from related articles; try the Find link tool for suggestions. (February 2013) Kyffhäuser was a Verwaltungsgemeinschaft (“collective municipality”) in the district Kyffhäuserkreis, in Thuringia, Germany. It was disbanded on 31 December 2012. The seat of the Verwaltungsgemeinschaft was in Bendeleben. The Verwaltungsgemeinschaft Kyffhäuser consisted of the following municipalities:Badra Bendeleben Göllingen Günserode Hachelbich Oberbösa Rottleben Seega SteinthalebenCoordinates: 51°22′01″N 11°00′00″E / 51.367°N 11.000°E / 51.367; 11.000Authority controlWorldCat Identities VIAF: 248278879 GND: 2150164-6 This Kyffhäuserkreis location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it. v t e. thanks wikipedia.

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Tony Prince

For the fictional Grand Theft Auto IV character, see List of Grand Theft Auto IV: The Ballad of Gay Tony characters § #.22Gay.22_Tony_Prince. Tony Prince (born Thomas Whitehead in Oldham, Lancashire, 9 May 1944) is a British radio disc jockey and businessman, remembered for programmes on Radio Caroline and Radio Luxembourg in the 1960s and 1970s. He worked as a jockey and toolmaker and played in a local band, The Jasons. In 1962, he started as a club DJ, and moved to Bristol to work for Top Rank. He presented an early ITV pop music programme, Discs-a-Gogo. In 1965, he joined the pirate radio station Radio Caroline North on a ship in the Irish Sea, developing his personality as “your royal ruler”. After the 1967 Marine Offences Act banned pirate radio, he joined Radio Luxembourg. He continued to present programmes after becoming programme director there in 1977. He played Elvis Presley songs non-stop on hearing about the singer’s death on August 16 of that year. He was programme director until 1984. Around 1981, he began playing DJ mixes of dance records and started the Disco Mix Club Show. On returning to Britain, he launched DMC as a record subscription club in 1983. He also launched the magazine Mixmag, later sold to EMAP. Prince continues to run the company, now known as DMC International. Recent projects include Wedding TV, which Prince co-founded. The channel (available on Sky Digital) won the “Best Specialist Channel” award at the annual Broadcast Digital Channel Awards in 2008. External links[edit]Tony Prince at ‘The Pirate Radio Hall of Fame’. thanks wikipedia.

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Whitchurch, Shropshire

For other places with the same name, see Whitchurch (disambiguation). WhitchurchBlack Bear Inn at the junction of Church St. and High St.Whitchurch Whitchurch shown within ShropshirePopulation 9,781 (2011) OS grid reference SJ541415 Civil parish Whitchurch Urban Unitary authority Shropshire Ceremonial county Shropshire Region West Midlands Country England Sovereign state United Kingdom Post town WHITCHURCH Postcode district SY13 Dialling code 01948 Police West Mercia Fire Shropshire Ambulance West Midlands EU Parliament West Midlands UK Parliament North Shropshire List of places UK England Shropshire Coordinates: 52°58′08″N 2°40′55″W / 52.969°N 2.682°W / 52.969; -2.682 Whitchurch is a market town in Shropshire, England, 2 miles (3 km) east of the Welsh border. Located on the North Shropshire Plain in the Welsh Marches and close to the Cheshire border, it is the oldest continuously inhabited town in Shropshire.[1] The town is 20 miles (30 km) north of the county town of Shrewsbury, 20 miles (30 km) south of Chester, and 15 miles (24 km) east of Wrexham. According to the 2001 Census, the population of the town is 8,673, increasing to 9,781 at the 2011 census.[2] The town is located in the Whitchurch Urban civil parish, and is twinned with the French town of Neufchâtel-en-Bray.Contents 1 History 2 Transport 3 Economy 4 Notabilities 5 Sport 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] Further information: Mediolanum (Whitchurch) Originally a settlement founded by the Romans around AD 52 or 70, it was called Mediolanum (lit. “Midfield” or “Middle of the Plain”). The settlement was located on a major Roman road between Chester and Wroxeter and Roman artefacts can be seen at the Whitchurch Heritage Centre.[3] It was listed on the Antonine Itinerary but is not the Mediolanum of Ptolemy’s Geography, which was in central Wales. Whitchurch was in the hundred of Hodnet in 1086.[4] The current name is from the Middle English for “White Church”, in reference to a church constructed from white stone during the Norman period. During the reign of Henry I in the 12th century, Whitchurch was within the North Division of Bradford Hundred which by the 1820s was referred to as North Bradford Hundred.[5] These days the town’s most prominent place of worship is St Alkmund’s Anglican parish church. It was built in 1712 of red sands. thanks wikipedia.

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United Nations Security Council Resolution 1215

UN Security Council Resolution 1215 Date 17 December 1998 Meeting no. 3,956 Code S/RES/1215 (Document) Subject The situation concerning Western SaharaVoting summary15 voted for None voted against None abstained Result Adopted Security Council compositionPermanent members  China  France  Russia  United Kingdom  United States Non-permanent members  Bahrain  Brazil  Costa Rica  Gabon  Gambia  Japan  Kenya  Portugal  Slovenia  SwedenUnited Nations Security Council resolution 1215, adopted unanimously on 17 December 1998, after reaffirming all previous resolutions on the question of the Western Sahara, in particular Resolution 1204 (1998), the Council extended the mandate of the United Nations Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara (MINURSO) until 31 January 1999 to allow for further consultations between parties.[1] The Security Council took note of the Moroccan government’s view and that the Polisario Front was to implement measures proposed by the Secretary-General Kofi Annan in his report to further the Settlement Plan. It noted that his proposals to launch simultaneously the identification and appeals processes would demonstrate their willingness to accelerate plans for a referendum. Both parties were called upon to sign the refugee repatriation protocol with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and allow the UNHCR to conduct preparatory work for the repatriation of the refugees. Morocco was called upon to conclude a Status of Forces Agreement to facilitate the deployment of MINURSO military units. The resolution concluded by asking the Secretary-General to report to the Council by 22 January 1999 on developments in Western Sahara. See also[edit]Free Zone (region) History of Western Sahara List of United Nations Security Council Resolutions 1201 to 1300 (1998–2000) Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic Wall (Western Sahara)References[edit] ^ “Security Council extends mission in Western Sahara until 31 January 1999”. United Nations. 17 December 1998.  External links[edit]Text of Resolution at UNdemocracy.com Wikisource has original text related to this article: United Nations Security Council Resolution 1215v t e United Nations Security Council resolutions adopted in 1998← 1147 1148 1149 1150 1151 1152 1153 1154 1155 1156 1157 1158 1159 1160 1161 1162 1163 1164 1. thanks wikipedia.

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Stefano Raffaele

Stefano RaffaeleStefano Raffaele, at the 40th Angoulême International Comics Festival, 2013.Born (1970-03-15) March 15, 1970 (age 46) Milan Nationality Italian Area(s) Writer, Penciller, Inker http://www.stefanoraffaele.com Stefano Raffaele (born March 15, 1970) is an Italian comics book artist.Contents 1 Biography 2 Bibliography 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Milan, his first published work was in Lazarus Ledd #4 in 1994. From the following year, he worked for American comics series such as New Gods, Birds of Prey, Batman, X-Men Adventures, X-Factor and Conan the Barbarian. In 2000, he pencilled Arkhain, a science-fiction mini-series published by Marvel Italia. He also wrote and drew Fragile which appeared in Metal Hurlant magazine. In 2007, it was announced that Fragile would be made into a film to be directed by Eduardo Rodriguez.[1] Bibliography[edit]This section requires expansion. (December 2009) Comics work includes:The Blackburne Covenant (with writer Fabian Nicieza, 4-issue mini-series, Dark Horse Comics, 2003, hardcover, ISBN 1-56971-889-X) Fragile (script and art, in Metal Hurlant magazine, #4, 7-8, 10-14, 2003–2004, tpb, DC Comics, 168 pages, 2005, ISBN 1-4012-0645-X)Notes[edit] ^ “Zombie story for Rodriguez”, Variety, October 3, 2007 References[edit] Stefano Raffaele at the Grand Comics Database Stefano Raffaele at the Comic Book DB External links[edit]Official website Authority controlWorldCat Identities VIAF: 74082839 ISNI: 0000 0000 0143 1735 SUDOC: 077360060 BNF: cb14501326b (data) This profile of a European comics creator, writer, or artist is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it. v t e. thanks wikipedia.

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Vediamoci chiaro

Vediamoci chiaroDirected by Luciano Salce Cinematography Danilo Desideri Language Italian Vediamoci chiaro (Let’s See It Clear) is a 1984 Italian comedy film directed by Luciano Salce.[1][2] The author Enrico Giacovelli referred to the film as “a kind of Scent of a Woman but more ambiguous, midway between Luigi Pirandello’s Henry IV and The Late Mattia Pascal”.[3] Cast[edit]Johnny Dorelli: Alberto Catuzzi Eleonora Giorgi: Eleonora Bauer Janet Agren: Geneviève Giacomo Furia: Peppino Angelo Infanti: Gianluca Milly D’Abbraccio: Monique Geoffrey Copleston: MercalliReferences[edit] ^ Roberto Poppi. Dizionario del cinema italiano: I film. Gremese, 2000. ISBN 887742429X.  ^ Andrea Pergolari. Verso la commedia: momenti del cinema di Steno, Salce, Festa Campanile. Firenze libri, 2002.  ^ Enrico Giacovelli. La commedia all’italiana. Gremese Editore, 1995. ISBN 8876058737.  External links[edit]Vediamoci chiaro at the Internet Movie Database This article related to an Italian film of the 1980s is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it. v t e This film article about a 1980s comedy is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it. v t e. thanks wikipedia.

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James Wong

James Wong may refer to:James Wong (bishop) (born 1960), Anglican bishop of the Seychelles James Wong (ethnobotanist) (born 1981), British ethnobotanist, television presenter and garden designer James Wong (footballer) (born 1952), former Malaysian footballer James Wong (politician) (1922–2011), Malaysian politician James Wong (filmmaker) (born 1959), Cantonese-American television producer, writer, and film director Jimmy Wong (James Franklin Wong, born 1987), American actor, musician, and filmmaker James Wong (lyricist) (1940–2004), lyricistSee also[edit]James Wong Howe (1899–1976), cinematographer This disambiguation page lists articles about people with the same name. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article. thanks wikipedia.

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Brass Monkeys

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (November 2010) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) Brass Monkeys is an Australian sitcom that screened in 1984 on the Seven Network. The series was produced by Gary Reilly and Tony Sattler, who are known for comedy series Kingswood Country and Hey Dad!. The title comes from the colloquial expression “cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey”, in reference to the cold climate of the Antarctic. Brass Monkeys is the story of a pretty female doctor who joins a group of men confined to the lonely isolation of an Australian Antarctic expedition station. Cast[edit]Graeme Blundell as Noddy Paul Chubb as Big Eye Kevin Golsby as OIC Ross Hohnen as Rex Margie McCrae as Dr. Sally Newman Colin McEwan as Nick Doug Scroope as Cookie Bill Young as Martin LightfootReferences[edit]External links[edit]Brass Monkeys at the Internet Movie Database. thanks wikipedia.

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Current History

For the study of recent historical events, see Contemporary history.This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (May 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Current History   Abbreviated title (ISO 4)Curr. Hist. Discipline World affairs Language English Edited by Alan Sorensen Publication details PublisherDaniel Mark Redmond (United States) Publication history1914–present Frequency 9 per yearImpact factor (2014)0.127 Indexing ISSN 0011-3530 OCLC no. 875826836 JSTOR 00113530 Links Journal homepage Current History is the oldest United States-based publication devoted exclusively to contemporary world affairs. The magazine was founded in 1914 by George Washington Ochs Oakes, brother of New York Times publisher Adolph Ochs, in order to provide detailed coverage of World War I. Current History was published by The New York Times Company from its founding until 1936. Since 1942 it has been owned by members of the Redmond family; its current publisher is Daniel Mark Redmond.[1] Current History, based in Philadelphia, maintains no institutional, political, or governmental affiliation. It is published monthly, from September through May. Seven issues each year are devoted to world regions (China and East Asia, Russia and Eurasia, the Middle East, Latin America, Europe, South Asia, and Africa); one issue covers current global trends; and one issue addresses a special theme such as climate change or global governance. The magazine has followed this practice of devoting each issue to a single region or theme since 1953. Each issue includes a chronology of major international events, and most contain a book review section and an article devoted to commentary. Contributors to Current History in the publication’s early years included George Bernard Shaw, Winston Churchill, Charles A. Beard, Allan Nevins, and Henry Steele Commager. More recently, the journal has featured authors such as James Schlesinger, Francis Fukuyama, Jeffrey Sachs, Bruce Riedel, Leslie H. Gelb, Bruce Russett, Elizabeth Economy, Charles Kupchan, Ivo Daalder, Joseph Cirincione, Phebe Marr, Juan Cole, Bruce Gilley, and Marina Ottaway. Shortly after Current History began publishing in 1914, its editor, Ochs Oakes, decided that a magazine recording “history in the m. thanks wikipedia.

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Ennaivayal

This article is an orphan, as no other articles link to it. Please introduce links to this page from related articles; try the Find link tool for suggestions. (December 2010) Ennaivayal village Country  India State Tamil Nadu District Thanjavur Population (2001)  • Total 438 Languages  • Official Tamil Time zone IST (UTC+5:30) Ennaivayal is a village in the Pattukkottai taluk of Thanjavur district, Tamil Nadu, India. Demographics[edit] As per the 2001 census, Ennaivayal had a total population of 438 with 205 males and 233 females. The sex ratio was 1137. The literacy rate was 57.49. References[edit]”Primary Census Abstract – Census 2001″. Directorate of Census Operations-Tamil Nadu.  This Thanjavur district location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it. v t e. thanks wikipedia.

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